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Graciela Angeles Tag

Just back from the San Antonio Cocktail Conferences (my recap is here) where I was able to attend some terrific seminars helmed by a few leaders in the industry, who happen to be women. I say it like that because I am becoming increasingly uncomfortable with how marginalizing it feels to use the phrasing female bartenders, female distillers, female brand ambassadors, etc when really, we have been here all along. The rest of the world is just waking up to that. By putting female, or woman before laymen's terms, it continues to make us more of a novelty or side bar, rather than the truth of the matter - we are fully integrated in this business, as marketers, as writers, as owners and as consumers.

The story of mezcal is one that deserves its own category of films. It has everything - gorgeous vistas full of saturated color, rich history full of myth and romance and opera-like drama with the incredible stories of the families that have been making mezcal for generations. The plot lines are limitless.

[caption id="attachment_6827" align="aligncenter" width="960"] New library in Santa Catarina Minas. Photo by Graciela Angeles[/caption]

This is not a rhetorical question and in fact it remained at the forefront of my mind as I spoke with brands, mezcaleros, development people, and academics while I was in Oaxaca, and prompted so many more questions. Why is there such an intense focus on sustainability within the mezcal industry? Just what is it about mezcal that inspires such a hard core call for sustainability?

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