fbpx
Top
Image Alt

February 2017

After years of wanting to go, I finally made the trek to Juchitan de Zaragoza and hid it in the old - we'll take the non-mountainous way to Puerto Escondido which just happens to go by Juchitan - trick to get the family on board with this semi out of the way excursion. En route on the Pan American Highway, we got waylaid by a bloqueo (road block) and waited it out at a Pemex station for three hours. This meant driving in the dark and trying to navigate the streets of Juchitan, in the dark with google maps as our guide, until we finally arrived at the beautiful home where we stayed for two nights.

Isaiah,  my 12 year old growing boy,  requires a constant supply of sustenance. For a budding teenager, he has a pretty developed sense of taste, aside from a couple of major failings, number one being he does not like Oaxacan chocolate followed closely by his disdain of that oh so Oaxacan dish, mole negro. He will however chow down on a bag of chapulines and even has his favorite vendors at the 20 de Noviembre market.

[caption id="attachment_5636" align="alignnone" width="1024"] What do you call it?[/caption] Editor's Note: This contribution comes to us from Lou Bank, a mezcal aficionado and force of nature in the mezcal world who organizes tastings, fund raises for causes in Oaxaca, and generally spreads the good word about mezcal. He's based in Chicago and travels frequently to mezcal country. We've had a variation of the conversation below with Lou ever since we met him. While in so many other areas of the world appellations have worked to the advantage of most people involved in creating traditional agricultural products, the world of agave spirits in Mexico has left people and traditions behind.

Call this perks of the job... I recently was invited to the kickoff for a new dinner series at Cala, Gabriela Camara's Mexican restaurant outpost in SF, centered on mezcal. We've written before about the restaurant and its focus on not only sustainable food, but also sustainable mezcal. This was the dinner that really brought it together in a fantastic way. The brainchild of Cala bar manager Marsilio Gabuardi, the idea is to pair a mezcal with each course. It's not new, the difference here is that there is only a mezcal pairing - no cocktails, no wine, no beer, just mezcal. This first dinner highlighted Mezcal Amaras, which is pretty much the house mezcal at Cala. The surprise of the night was being able to taste new Amaras expressions, including a tepeztate and cenizo, along with three different espadins and their cupreata. We were joined by Amaras U.S. brand rep Sofía Acosta Rascón and, to the delight of all of us, Gabriela Camara herself.

You don't have permission to register