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Posts tagged ‘david suro’

David Suro on the agave price spike

Yesterday Siembra Valles and Tequila Interchange Project founder David Suro posted the following to Facebook on the agave price spike that everyone has been discussing over the past months. In July it seemed like 18 pesos a kilo was extravagant, that was a huge topic of discussion at Tales of the Cocktail where the focus was on agave syrup as a culprit.  Now it sounds like the price has crept even higher and the debate has expanded.

In the comments, Jake Lustig from Haas Brothers, which includes mezcals like Don Amado and Mina Real, blames diffusers and industry consolidation in a really sharp cost breakdown. David Suro’s conclusion is much the same of many others concerned with this issue: In the comments he says “If you have someone showing you an Agave spirit below 25.00 USD its just a big red flag! At this time is absolutely no way that those prices are sustainable and ethical.” So that’s something we here in the U.S. and globally can clearly influence. Take note bartenders and buyers!

 

 

 

On meeting David Suro

It seems hard to believe that our paths hadn’t crossed before but I finally had the opportunity to meet David Suro, he of Tequila Restaurant in Philadelphia, the Tequila Interchange Project (TIP) and Siembra Azul Tequila. For a good picture of the man and his passion for agave, be sure to checkout the great interview The Kitchen Sisters did with him a few years back.

Suro is in town doing a series of trainings and tastings for his Siembra Azul Tequila and Siembra Metl Mezcal. A special dinner at Oakland’s Calavera on Monday, a happy hour at Loló Tuesday, and a training and talk at ABV Wednesday. A whirlwind of activity for sure.

So what’s on Suro’s mind these days? Read more

The NOM 199 surprise

There’s nothing quite like an unexpected news dump on Thanksgiving that took more than a couple of days to bubble up into the public view.

David Suro first flagged the release of heretofore unheard of NOM 199 which seems to be some sort of bastard child of the failed NOM 186. Clayton Szczech, who has done great work covering the evolution of the NOM in Mexico, has a great synopsis and preliminary thoughts of the document and implications for mezcal: Read more