Skip to content

Posts from the ‘Products’ Category

You got your agave in my chocolate

 

 

roots_chocolates

 

A post from our Chicago partner Lou Bank, who we first met in Oaxaca over mezcal, of course. 


 

Lisa Nelson is a fourth-generation farm owner in rural Wisconsin. When she took over the family farm, she knew she wanted to do something that leveraged the heritage of her farm, but did so in a unique way. “Farming is a hard enough business,” Lisa said. “It’s harder still if you don’t have a way to differentiate yourself.” Her point of differentiation is one that piques both interest and appetite: she uses the bounty of her farm to make artisanal chocolates.

The terroir of Lisa’s farm is displayed in the over 40 fruits, vegetables, herbs, and honey she infuses into the treats she releases as Roots Chocolates. But she doesn’t stop there: She has also established partnerships — what she calls “cho-lab-ah-ray-shons” — with other farm-related businesses. And that’s where this suddenly becomes a topic of special interest to readers of Mezcalistas. Read more

Moreno’s Liquors demonstrate mezcal’s deep roots in Chicago

moreno7

A post from our Chicago partner Lou Bank, who we first met in Oaxaca over mezcal, of course. Together we are bringing Mezcal: Mexico in a Bottle to Chicago for the first time this September 18th, 2016. Get your tickets today!

Chicagoans have seen a relative boom in mezcal recently, with agave-centric bars joining standard-bearers like Frontera, Masa Azul, and Dove’s. But the seeds for all of them were planted four decades ago, in the 1970s, when Mike Moreno had a vision for a store that brought Mexican and Latin American beers, wines, and spirits to the people of Chicago’s Little Village neighborhood. “I wanted to bring our culture to our community,” he explains.

La Preferida had $127,000 in Mexican beers that they could not sell,” said the soft-spoken entrepreneur. “When I told them I wanted some of it for a store that would cater to the people living in Little Village, they did not think it would work. But it wasn’t long before I had purchased all of that beer from them.” Read more

State of the industry update

IMG_9881

Ven a Comer is this year’s MexIAM motto.

Last year’s Mexican Consulate tasting was a good snapshot of what a lot of mezcal makers’ ambitions. As I wrote at the time, there was an awful lot of mezcal out there trying to get into the North American market. The production volumes were enormous, and there were a tremendous number of brands vying for attention. The strange thing is Read more

Mezcal’s European challenge

Finding time for mezcal in Italy can be a challenge given competition like this.

Finding time for mezcal in Italy can be a challenge given competition like this.

My recent European swing meant that I was most frequently focused on things other than mezcal like wine, beer, the European cup, and Romanesque architecture. But I did make plenty of time to stop in at liquor stores, chat up bartenders, and other cognoscenti to see what’s up with mezcal in the old world. The results are wildly disparate and, given that I only visited three countries, my observations are skewed but here’s a quick field report. Read more

Copitas among us!

Omar Hernanez in his taller

Omar Hernanez in his taller

If you’re really into mezcal you have probably already been acquainted with Omar Hernandez‘s creations. He’s a Oaxaca based ceramicist whose copitas are starting to pop up in bars and restaurants in the United States but cover the walls, shelves, and anything else they’ll sit on at his taller at Alcalá 303 in Oaxaca. It’s on the main drag just down from Santo Domingo and next door to Oro de Oaxaca which makes it difficult to miss. Read more