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Posts from the ‘Food’ Category

You wanted mezcal – We’re bringing you mezcal

MIB2015_vert

As anyone who attended last year’s Mezcal: Mexico in a Bottle knows this event is not to be missed. It’s an opportunity to taste an incredible variety of mezcals and meet their makers while also sampling snacks from some of the best local restaurants and mezcal cocktails from all those creative bartenders who are getting written up in flashy magazines.

But this year we just had to go and make it bigger, badder, and better. First, why mess with success, the Grand Tasting is on November 15th at Public Works and will be very similar to last year’s event except that we’ll be adding mezcals and we’re going to have some very special tastings led by some of the most interesting people in the business. But keep in mind, only Mezcal Lovers tickets get access to those special tastings so choose wisely.

The preceding week will see a variety of special mezcal themed events throughout the San Francisco Bay Area including a US Bartender Guild juried competition for the best mezcal cocktail at Devil’s Acre on November 9th, special cocktail parties, dinners, a meeting with key figures in the industry, and more. As we say, check the schedule and get your tickets today.

But why stop there? November 8 – 15 is now officially Mezcal Week with special mezcal cocktails, flights, and snacks available at finer dining establishments and bars across the region. All participants are donating a portion of their proceeds to this year’s non-profit partner, the Mexican Museum. This is your opportunity to taste just how incredible and varied this transformative spirit is. If you can’t find something great on our list of participating venues then you don’t have a pulse.

So, join us and get your tickets today. Last year we sold out, don’t be left out in the cold!

On authenticity

A lovely run-in with Sara Deseran at EatDrinkSF’s Taco Knockdown got my writing juices flowing. I was just going to the event, not intending to write about it, take pictures of it, just to enjoy it. A crazy conceit – line up some of SF’s best restaurants and have them make their interpretations of tacos. I am not a purist when it comes to tacos – as long as that balance of savory, acid and crunch exists, and the delivery device (whatever variation of a tortilla) holds up and is not drowned out by too much on top, I am down. I remember giving an ex-boyfriend a mix tape of blues music with the explanation of how every culture has blues music if you step away from the strict chord structure definition – what is fado or flamenco if not a serious case of the blues? Needless to say, the tape did not go over well. Words were exchanged for many many many weeks.

That memory came back strong when Sara and I talked about authenticity and she reminded me of the article she wrote about the subject (well worth the read if you haven’t seen it yet) and it opened a whole floodgate of feelings on the subject. I remembered the panel discussion that SoCal based writer Gustavo Arellano organized and moderated at Eat Real LA in 2011 all about the subject of authentic Mexican food in the United States and basically called bull on the very idea. Even in Mexico it is impossible to put that label on things, and really, why does it matter?

I can’t follow a recipe to save my life which is why I don’t bake. When I read a recipe I see a starting point and flavor guidelines. And then I have to change it up a bit. A cooking teacher in Oaxaca was horrified that I made my chicken broth with some epazote – traditionally, that is not to be added until you are making the soup. But I love to smell epazote and I love the smell of broth as it is cooking and so I put them together and created a great base for my Sopa Azteca, rendering it totally inauthentic. But it tasted damn good.

And that’s the crux of it, because really, when you have an Ichi Sushi or Chaya Brasserie or Dosa or Mekong Kitchen making tacos, you have to know there will be nothing “authentic” about them, and frankly I have no interest in creating a taco denomination. But they will be pretty damn good, and like Sara, I think that is what is most important when it comes to pursuing food. 

But how does this relate to mezcal, or why should it? With more people traveling to Oaxaca because of mezcal, this inevitably will lead to lots of discussion about what palenque or mezcaleria or mezcal is authentic, and of course the one upsmanship over who has had the most authentic experience or what constitutes authenticity. Whether it be traveling via car, colectivo, foot or burro to visit a palenque – achieving your alcohol grade by distilling to it, mixing heads and tails, maybe adding just a little bit of water get that 1-2% difference – triple distilling – fermenting in wood or hide – making an ensemble – cultivating silvestres — what makes any of these more, or less, authentic?

Soon we’ll see the final rules and regulations from the Consejo (CRM, previously known as COMERCAM) that will define artesanal, traditional and industrial mezcal — but I doubt they will ever define authentic. This is good and important and gives us guidelines, but what truly matters at the end of the day is if a mezcal tastes good.

Oh, and the judges favorite taco of the night? The  simple and traditional (and delicious) birria de chivo from Trick Dog. The crowd favorite? The duck curry from Dosa.

Quick look: Calavera Restaurant and Agave Bar

I had the lucky opportunity to check out Calavera Restaurant in Oakland ahead of its official open. This is Chris Pastena’s latest creation after Chop Bar, Tribune Tavern and Lungomare. I’d heard about Calavera a while back and was especially excited by their plans to stock more than 80 mezcals. I mean, how could I not be excited?

Located on Broadway, in a restored Julia Morgan building, it is a large, open restaurant with simple yet beautiful design that shines through with the hanging lights (not Edison lights!). The orangish back wall has very lightly and subtly embossed skulls, and a gorgeous long bar with a wall of mezcal that resembles a library because of the wheeled ladder used to access all the protruding boxes which contain all that precious mezcal.

And what a collection of mezcals – this place is serious. Pastena knows his stuff and has put together quite a list with specific selections from Mezonte, In Situ, and 400 Rabbits, plus the full collections from Vago, Del Maguey, Pierde Almas, Alipus, Mezcalero and more. Mezcal is served in ceramic copitas crafted by Oaxacan artist Omar Hernandez. It is this attention to detail that really shows the loving care put into creating this restaurant. There’s also a great list of cocktails – I tried the Sandia, a watermelon base with mezcal, salt air (foam), a sprinkling of chile de arbol and a watermelon garnish. Perfect for the heat of the evening.

The Sandia cocktail at Calavera

The Sandia cocktail at Calavera

Then there is the food… Chef Christian Irabien, whose background includes Oyamel Cocina Mexicana (Jose Andrés’ restaurant in DC) has crafted a unique menu that salutes tradition and simultaneously turns it around. We were a four top of serious and adventurous eaters and therefore were not shy at ordering as much as we could. Everything was delicious, from the ceviches to the refried beans to the chile relleno and to the grilled huachinango (oh how I love huachinango and so rarely eat it outside of Mexico.)

Calavera is the latest addition to Oakland’s collection of upscale Mexican restaurants which makes it quite a place to eat out. Between this latest addition, Tamarindo, Nido, and Doña Tomas it’s far easier for those of us on the east side of the bay to stay local while indulging our love for all things Mexican. I am greatly looking forward to spending some time at the bar, sipping my way through that list.

What was left of dessert

What was left of dessert

Copita of In Situ arroqueño

Copita of In Situ arroqueño

Grilled huachinango

Grilled huachinango

Guacamole with a side of chapulines

Guacamole with a side of chapulines

 

 

 

 

Days and Nights in Tijuana

[This is a truly lost piece. I wrote it in July of 2013 after an incredible trip to Tijuana and just sort of forgot about it until Max dug it out of our drafts folder on the blog. Yes, it has literally been sitting here in the blog for more than a year waiting for a few nips and tucks and we forgot about it. We can, and will, blame everything that has happened in the interim for the delay but it’s still a good piece and still fairly relevant. The figures and scenes described are more important today which only tells you that the Mexican culinary scene can still grow a ton. – Susan]

I have been wanting to go to Tijuana since hearing about the burgeoning food scene in 2012. Bill Esparza of Street Gourmet LA has been writing about it for the past couple of years and that piqued my interest. But recently there has been a steady drum beat of stories from friends and ferment in the media what with the recent New Yorker profile of chef Javier Plascencia (New Yorker subscribers only), and sundry other reporters descending on the iconic border town. Earlier this year the opportunity for a trip presented itself and I was off. With my imagination running wild of all I had ever heard (tacky, drunk college kids, dirty, horrible violence) saw (Touch of Evil) and read (Tijuana by Federico Campbell), I was excited, fascinated, and completely ready for anything.

So to Tijuana via the train from LA to San Diego and then the trolley to San Ysidro and a quick walk across the bridge to Mexico with my friend John who I talked into going with me. It is so easy going south, as if the border didn’t exist and is just some polite, diplomatic fiction that barely applies to Americans. Despite the rain, the cold and all those reservations about personal safety it turned out to be a fantastic trip.

Little did we know it was a holiday weekend, with Monday being the official observance of the first president of Mexico’s birthday. I surprised the hotel clerk when he mentioned this to us, and I said, oh, Benito Juarez Day. Only from my years in Oaxaca did I know this (he was born there and was the first and only fully indigenous president of Mexico.) This meant a lot of things were closed and the city was quite quiet. The city seems calm these days: That’s a far cry from just a few years ago when it was consumed by rampant violence that still hasn’t quite disappeared. Clearly the dark times suppressed the traditional and vivacious outdoors life of the place but it’s just as clearly coming back to life. Friends, locals, and blogs had provided a pretty comprehensive list of places to try which was a dramatic testament to just how far the place had come in a very short time.

We walked the infamous Avenida Revolucion – the main drag, party street, tacky souvenir lined boulevard. We needed food first and stopped at a taco stand recommended by Alonso at the hotel – Tacos el Gordo. We dove into Al Pastor, Suadero (a thinly sliced piece of beef cut from the brisket) and Carne Asada tacos. Without doubt, that Al Pastor was the best I have ever had – the meat so distinctive in flavor. When I pressed the guy about what the spices were, and we asked if it was Chinese 5 spice, he smiled and told me that there were actually 10 spices – and he was not budging. Bellies full, we continued onward. It was Sunday so things were quiet, and it was the day after St. Patty’s day, so it was really quiet on the Avenida. It is not a charming boulevard, and anyone who associates those classic images of colonial architecture and tree-lined zocolos with Tijuana will be sorely disappointed. But I found charm in its grittiness and striking street art. The fact is that it is not a precious town and never will be.

It reminds me a lot of Detroit, a city burdened by economic meltdown and a horrible reputation. Both cities see food as a way to rebuild – in Detroit you see it in the urban Ag movement, the growing number of food crafters, and emphasis on local food. And of course in the art. In Tijuana you see it in the growing number of restaurants and emphasis on local ingredients which encompass all the traditional Mexican food wares but also novelties like local wine and new culinary techniques. I want to believe that you can change a city through food, that it can be the blueprint on how to drive economic development.

After a few hours of strolling, we went in search of a late afternoon drink and ended up at Caesars Hotel. Yes, the same Caesars where the salad was invented, Bogey dined, and one of the original reasons for Tijuana’s fame. It is a beautiful place, with wood beamed ceilings and a very 1950’s supper club feel. The Plascencia family did an amazing job restoring the place to its full glory. We sat at the bar and absorbed the atmosphere, listening to the amazing jazz selection playing over the speaker. Eventually we were hungry again and ordered the salad, a crab stuffed pepper with an avocado butter sauce. Before we knew it, three hours had passed and we headed back to the hotel and had a nightcap before crashing.

We woke up to hard rain the next day. It was exactly opposite of how I’d imagined Tijuana, cold and dreary just like a summer day in San Francisco’s Sunset. Thankfully we were meeting up with a guy we’d been introduced to – Arturo Rodriguez, owner of La Caja Galeria. Getting there was an adventure – requiring Arturo to relay directions to our cab driver (no real address) that included lots of turns and small streets until finally we arrived in front of a beautiful, street art covered warehouse space. It’s an amazing gallery that works solely with contemporary Mexican artists. They also do workshops and gastronomic events that pair an artist with a chef and a meal inspired by the art. It was great to while away the hours sipping mezcal (of course) and talking food and art, the changing the world, and the perceptions of Tijuana.

And then it was off to more food adventures, and of course getting lost as we tried to find the infamous Torta Wash Mobile, supposedly makers of the best tortas ever. We never found it but instead ended up grabbing a taxi driven by the amazing Amado, taco aficionado and taxi driver extraordinaire. He loved that we were there to eat and as we hit a couple of taco stands on our list (Tacos Salceados and Takesos y Papas) he talked about the food he loved. He gave a description of a traditional Sinaloan bean dish that made my mouth simultaneously water and my heart contract (beans, lard, chorizo and cheese all blended together.) Food is the great gateway to meeting people and learning about a place and culture and having experiences like driving around Tijuana for 2.5 hour trying tacos – all different from one another – with a taxi driver who wanted nothing more than to proudly share his city’s diverse taco stands.

The question really is, how many tacos can a person eat before they have had enough? My answer, there is no such thing as too many, especially given the seemingly endless variations on marinades for the Al Pastor, variety of salsas, and the different ways the accompanying onions and peppers are spiced and grilled. Plus, given enough hours rambling around in a taxi, you never know.

Eventually we had to walk and that meant saying goodbye to Amado. I have his card for anyone who wants a great driver in Tijuana, just email me. Finally, the rain stopped and the sun lit everything up. We ended up at the downtown market, looking at piles of cheeses and cheap ceramics. I let go of any comparisons to the markets in Oaxaca –it’s just unfair to use Oaxaca as a baseline. But yes, back to the cheeses, of which there are many – hard, soft, aged, goat, sheep. I was impressed by the breadth of selection and the distinctive flavors, some traditionally Mexican, others more like French and Italian cheeses. Tijuana is a melting pot, it is a border town after all, and the mix of cultures and culinary styles make it unique and impossible to pigeon hole with a specific style.

We heard tell of a mezcaleria and went in search, ending up on the fish market street with an overwhelming smell and occasional fish in the gutter or on the sidewalk. The seafood here is amazing, as it should be given its coastal location. We walked by a store that sold cans of spray-paint, catering specifically to the street artists. Stencil art and graffiti are huge in Mexico and have already jumped into the gallery world. We’ve even presented a pair of shows in LA and SF which featured a Oaxacan street stencil/graffiti collective called La Piztola. In the future I’d really like to explore how that work jumped into the realm of art and what sort of impact it will have on all the artists.

We did find the place – though it wasn’t a mezcaleria as it only featured one mezcal – El Tinieblo – a mezcal from Tamaulipas, a state in northeastern Mexico. We had it served chilled – both a blanco and a reposado – and tried it in a cocktail made of tamarindo paste and chamoy (a savory sauce made from pickled apricot, plum or mango.) I wanted to buy a bottle, but not at $65 USD. We strolled leisurely back to the hotel, made a quick change and then headed out to the “gastronomic district” an area lined by dozens of restaurants. Most were closed because of the holiday. That hurt bad because the closures included Javier Plascencia’s Mision 19 where we were dying to eat. Instead we went to Villa Savario, another restaurant owned by the Plascencia family. We dined on a local cheese plate, agua chile (a style of ceviche that uses chile in addition to lime to “cook” the seafood) of scallop and tuna, Caesar salad and tuna and shrimp. We paired it with a tempranillo from the Guadalupe Valley – an area in Western Baja that produces dozens of wines. It was decadent and way too much after our afternoon of taco indulgence.

This in no way kept us from rising the next morning, our last, to a brilliant blue sky and overwhelming desire to try ONE LAST TACO STAND – Mariscos Ruben. So, at 10:30 in the morning we sat ourselves down at the stand and ordered shrimp agua chile, made fresh before our eyes in a molcajete, and fish and shrimp tacos. The agua chile was to die for, and I embarrassed myself by practically drinking the juice after we’d eaten all of the shrimp. If I could have had a beer and made a michelada with that juice, I could have died happily on the spot, with no regrets. Fortunately for me, taco trucks in Mexico don’t sell beer.

In contrast to the quick walk into the country, it took more than an hour to cross back over. The crossing is being rebuilt, to streamline or perhaps to make the process more difficult. All I know is that I hate that goddamn wall (it is not a fence) and can’t wait for it to come down some day.

The rise of the bugs

If you're shy when sampling insects, Don Bugito will make sure that it's quite an experience. Photo by Michael Skrzypek

If you’re shy when sampling insects, Don Bugito will make sure that it’s quite an experience. Photo by Michael Skrzypek

We hosted Don Bugito at our recent Mezcal: Mexico in a Bottle event because insects are pretty integral to mezcal and the Mexican culinary universe. But there’s much more to edible insects than tradition, they may very well be the food of the future.

Gran Mitla brings artisanal sal de gusano to the market

LOGO MITLA

While tasting Mezcal Vago with Judah Kuper recently he mentioned that he’s importing Gran Mitla, a specialty sal de gusano from Mitla, southeast of Oaxaca. Mitla is most well known as an amazing Zapotec archeological site but it’s also smack dab in the middle of roads leading into the hills where some amazing mezcal is made.

Gran Mitla is impressive for so many reasons, first off it’s just great to find sal de gusano available in the US because it’s such an important component of drinking mezcal. In the past it’s been so elusive that our only source was toting bags back from Oaxaca or goading friends into doing it for us. But Gran Mitla offers much more because it’s a distinct interpretation of the traditional sal de gusano. Most interpretations in Oaxaca are red and finely ground while Gran Mitla’s version uses a very dark red/brown pepper mixed with large crystals of salt and gusano which crunch in your mouth while imparting a truly distinct flavor. Dare I say it but craft sal de gusano has made the scene.

Recently I chatted with Grant Mitla’s creator Ricardo Acosta over email about what goes into Gran Mitla. First, it really is what we in North America define as a craft or artisanal product, in Mexico it’s a traditional product. They only use three ingredients, all hand harvested: Organic sea salt from Colima, red agave worms, and the Costeño Pepper which is endemic to Oaxaca.

Ricardo was inspired by a long held family recipe that his grandmother kept alive and passed onto his generation. The production process is pretty impressive, per Ricardo, the “agave worm is hand selected by taking the agave plant out of the earth and cleaning its roots, which are full of these worms.” They harvest exclusively from Espadin and Ricardo wanted to be clear that the entire process is sustainable. “It is important that after cleaning the plant roots, the agave is taken back to its place without any harm, so it keeps growing normally.” They also only harvest fully adult worms which have to be at least one year old. The age matters in developing a full flavor.

Adult agave harvested for Gran Mitla sal de gusano. Courtesy of Gran Mitla

Adult agave harvested for Gran Mitla sal de gusano. Courtesy of Gran Mitla

Then they take the adult worms and leave them to die and dry in the sun, then they’re toasted, ground up with the dried peppers, and ultimately mixed with the salt. Per Ricardo “The result is the best agave worm salt in Mexico and the world.”

I’ve found it locally at La Urbana in San Francisco but you can order it in the United States through Mezcal Vago’s web site or in Mexico through Gran Mitla’s web site and the big Mexican liquor store La Europea. As Ricardo was quick to remind me Gran Mitla and sal de gusano in general has far more uses than as an accompaniment to mezcal. It’s a fantastic spice that works well with all sorts of foods so try dusting your next mixed seafood grill with some or use it on the table like salt to give your dishes a salty umami charge.

(Photo courtesy of Ricardo Acosta)

Sal de gusano

Sal de gusanoOccasionally the literal translation really does work the best, this time it gets us 60% of the way there with “worm salt.” Sal de gusano is actually ground up salt, dried worms, and peppers. You see it everywhere in Oaxaca. It’s sold in small bags by elderly women around the market, in huge piles within markets, and it appears everywhere in the local cuisine. It’s also an intimate part in the traditional way of drinking mezcal; you’re supposed to sit at a table with friends sharing a bottle of mezcal drunk from copitas or jicaras and, as you sip away while debating the topics of the day, dip orange or pineapple slices into a bowl of sal de gusano so that you get a blast of fruit tempered by the salty, umami flavors in the sal de gusano. It’s a tremendous foil to the heat and flavors in mezcal.

Sal de gusano is also a perfect example of the fruit of necessity because the peppers grow right along side the agave plants while salt was produced on the nearby isthmus. Classic Oaxacan cuisine features sal de gusano in some recipes, occasionally you’ll find it as a table top condiment, but I’ve really seen it break out in more contemporary interpretations of Oaxacan cooking.

Read more of our entries in the Mezcalistas Encyclopedia of Mezcal and email us questions or ideas for future entries.

Don’t believe the hype, mole is as Mexican as mezcal

A friend recently passed along this story which provocatively speculates that mole came to Mexico through the Islamic influence in Spain. It seemed like a great story and sparked lots of discussion. If we had been in a bar I’m sure this would have gone on until one of us hit the floor. Fortunately an archeologist friend of that original friend got wind of the discussion and jumped in to dispel our wayward hypothesis. That gentleman is named Ian Robertson–an archaeologist who works at Teotihuacan, and whose suegra is an excellent cocinera de mole. Here’s what he had to say:

“It’s easy for me to acknowledge that modern Mexican foodways owe a lot to the Spanish, and to imagine that the Spanish may have adopted a lot of their cuisine from the Moors. But it goes too far to lay any serious claim to mole! If you ignore mole poblano for the moment, most Mexican moles are essentially prehispanic dishes, easily recognizable from the writings of Sahagun. There are few or no innovations in ingredients or cooking methods that you can attribute to post-conquest contact. Mole poblano is essentially a prehispanic dish elaborated with some new spices, and it’s probably the most deliberately innovative of the group.”

“Then there’s the linguistic issue: Molli (the Nahuatl word for what we call mole) may (sort of) mean “sauce”, but more fundamentally, it means sauce produced through the action of grinding things. The Nahuatl verb “mola” means “to grind”, hence molcaxitl (molcajete in modern Spanish), kitchen tools that go way back in the archaeological record. The article’s claim that the word “mole” has at least some etymological connections with Spanish and/or Portuguese is simply wrong.”

If this discussion got you hungry make sure that you plan to attend the upcoming Feria de los Moles on October 6th or the Taste of Mexico event on October 11th. Both are in LA, the latter will feature mezcal and our very own Susan Coss will be in the mix.

La Urbana is coming…

There’s been a lot of buzz around the plans for La Urbana, a full-scale mezcaleria and restaurant opening in San Francisco’s Western Addition, or NOPA, neighborhood. The owners have completely gutted an old hydroponics store and surrounded it with plywood painted with a stunning black and white piece of street art by Zio Zeigler. It’s an ambitious project and Max and I had an opportunity to see the progress the other night.

We met with bar manager and mezcal project lead Lucas Ranzuglia, an Argentinean who has spent the past several years living in Mexico City. A long time spirit industry person, he is overseeing the bar program, and working with project lead/architect/designer Juan Garduno. The Mexican artists Hector Falcon and Fernando Llanos are working away on stencils that are working their way across furniture and mounted work.

The scope of the project is huge and will open in waves. Lucas is aiming to open the main corner restaurant space first sometime in August. It’s a huge space embracing a full restaurant, bar, and a private tasting room lit by skylights and walls of windows. The entrance is grand – two leaded, glass doors imported from Mexico; a Yucatecan tiled floor is taking shape and there’s a hole in the floor that awaits a tree. The centeral focus is the long bar backed by suspended wood cabinets and dressers all imported from Mexico. It would be fair to say just about everything – chairs, tables, plant holders – is coming from Mexico.

When done, Lucas says they are hoping to have almost 30 mezcals (be still my beating heart!) and 20 tequilas at the bar. He’s promising an extensive training regimen for the staff with hopes to bring mezcaleros and experts (Ulises Torrentera!) from Mexico for special events and tastings. I did mention huge in scope, right?

Initially the dining room will be open for dinner, and then ultimately brunch. They’re trying to inject the high end approach El Pujol from Mexico City into  the more traditional Mexican food most Estado Unidenses are used to finding in the Bay Area (Lolo aside) so expect surprises. The second phase will be the opening of a casual dining space – think a typical mercado fondo feel – in the space next door. Down the road they play to open their second story space to private parties, tastings, and special events. When completed it will be the largest Mexican restaurant in San Francisco.

Cocktails will of course be a focus, with unique recipes developed by Lucas. Since he knows his mezcals we are most interested to see what the final list will be – especially given that San Francisco is a third tier market for mezcal brands introduced to the US market (New York and Texas remain first and second). After an extensive conversation with Lucas it’s clear that there’s a keen dedication to quality and education. Perhaps San Francisco’s mezcal moment has finally arrived. We’re certainly looking forward to it, we’ll see you there opening night.

Here’s to a smooth final inspection process and an opening in August!

Leaded glass doors

Leaded glass doors

Yucatecan tile floors

Yucatecan tile floors

Cabinets behind the bar

Cabinets behind the bar

 

Back of chairs

Back of chairs

Music+Art+Mezcal=Fun

A tremendous thanks to all of you who stopped by Sub-Mission Gallery this past Saturday for our Music.Art.Mezcal. extravaganza. It was a dream come true to organize an event like this. For me, I can’t imagine mezcal existing in a vacuum without music, art and food to accompany it. It’s personal for sure and goes back to that moment in time in 2003, in the panteon in Oaxaca, surrounded by Dia de los Muertos altars, banda musica, dancers and a bottle of mezcal being passed around.

Of course a huge thank you to the artists whose work adorned the walls: Calixto Robles, Joaquin Newman, Txutxo Perez, Lapiztola Stencil, Yescka, Lorena Zertuche, Viet Chévez and Knut Hildebrandt. All of the art is for sale, so if you see something in the below gallery that catches your fancy, let us know and we’ll connect you with the artist!

We were also blessed with delicious mole and empanadas from Soul Cocina and a mezcal mocha banana creme brulee from The Creme Brulee Man that was heaven on earth.

Max and I had a great time talking mezcal, sharing the stories (and tastes) of mezcal from Don Pedro Garcia, Reyna Sanchez (Reinita) and Mezcal Tosba.

Check out the great photos that hopefully capture the energy of the night. There is something potent and magical about the combination of food, art, music and mezcal. We are hoping this is the first of more – and in fact, plans are underway for another extravaganza at the end of July.

Again, thanks for such a fun night!

Art by Yescka

Art by Yescka

Photos by Knut Hildebrandt

Photos by Knut Hildebrandt

Los Magueyes by Lorena Zertuche

Los Magueyes by Lorena Zertuche

Photos by Viet Chévez

Photos by Viet Chévez

Lapiztola Stencil

Lapiztola Stencil

El tigger by Lapiztola Stencil

El tigger by Lapiztola Stencil

Art by Joaquin Newman

Art by Joaquin Newman

 

Max talking mezcal

Max talking mezcal

happy attendee

happy attendee

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Admiring the art

Admiring the art

Txutxo Perez

Txutxo Perez

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Food by Soul Cocina

Food by Soul Cocina

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Mezcal Tosba

Mezcal Tosba

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Lorena Zertuche and her wall of Los Magueyes

Lorena Zertuche and her wall of Los Magueyes

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DJ Ricardo Ibarra of Radio Indigena spinning tunes

DJ Ricardo Ibarra of Radio Indigena spinning tunes

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Yescka and friends

Yescka and friends

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Art by Txutxo Perez

Art by Txutxo Perez

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Art by Txutxo Perez

Art by Txutxo Perez

Stencil by Lapiztola Stencil

Stencil by Lapiztola Stencil

Mezcal photo wall by Knut Hildebrandt

Mezcal photo wall by Knut Hildebrandt

T-shirts by Yescka

T-shirts by Yescka

Mezcales Don Pedro y Reinita

Mezcales Don Pedro y Reinita

Artist Calixto Robles and his daughter

Artist Calixto Robles and his daughter

Jaguar y Magueyes by Calixto Robles

Jaguar y Magueyes by Calixto Robles

Art by Joaquin Newman

Art by Joaquin Newman

The patio at Sub-Mission

The patio at Sub-Mission

The chefs

The chefs

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